Lupinus perennis Perennial Lupine Sundial Lupine seeds & plants
(loo-PIE-nus  or  lup-een-uss   per-EN-is)
Easyliving Native Perennial Wildflowers
Native Wild Flower Seeds & Plants for Home Landscaping and Prairie Restoration

Lupinus perennis, perennial Lupine Sundial Lupine flower picture Habitat Bloom Period Color Height Inches Moisture Plant Spacing Lifespan
Lupinus perennis Perennial Lupine Sundial Lupine picture Sun Spring Summer  Purple to Blue 24 to 36 Dry to Moist 12 inches Perennial

     Lupinus perennis Perennial Lupine Sundial Lupine flower picture  Lupinus perennis Perennial Lupine Sundial Lupine flower picture Lupinus perennis Perennial Lupine picture 
click on picture for larger image

For other flowers visit the wildflower seed list , to order copy the orderform or 
email questions, comments, and orders to john@easywildflowers.com
We accept payment by check, money order & through PayPal
Lupinus perennis, Perennial Lupine potted plants are $4.00 each plus Boxing/UPS shipping.  Please contact us by email for availability & the correct shipping costs on potted plants.  I will need your address & zip code to calculate UPS shipping amounts.

Lupinus perennis seeds
Perennial or Sundial Lupine seed

approximate
number of seeds

approximate coverage
in square feet

1 packet -  $2.50 + shipping

 sq ft

1 ounce -  $6.50

1400   sq ft

1 pound - $40.00

22,600  

or Sundial Lupine prefers full sun in light soil, attracts butterflies, elongated flowerhead stacked with purple to blue blossoms, plants 24 to 36 inches tall, 22,600 seed lb, dry/moist, wild blue lupine, well drained sandy soil, dry open woods, blooms May to June,
Sundial is the only food for the larvae of the Karner Blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis). Both fire suppression and habitat loss have contributed to the decline of the lupine and the butterfly.  The Karner Blue is nearly extinct over much of its range.

        Perennial Lupine seeds germinate easily and quickly.  Lupines succumb to root rot very easily in pots, so it is best to transplant them to the garden when they have two to three leaves.  Seeds can also be  planted directly in the garden in spring (after scarification).  Seed can be sown with a yard roller or by walking the site.  Plant in full sun with good air circulation, in loose, well-drained soil.  The plants can tolerate poor, sandy, or gravely soil, preferably acid.  If no lupines have been present for many years on the site, wet the seeds and roll them in an inoculant for nitrogen-fixing bacteria before planting.  They should germinate in about one week.  The roots are strong and deep, making the moving of older established plants difficult.  

       Perennial Lupine grows wild in dry, open woods and clearings from southern Maine to Florida, west to Minnesota and Indiana.  The plant grows in Pine Barrens and sandy prairies in the east.

The map below shows areas where native Lupinus perennis, (perennial or Sundial Lupine) plants grow wild but it can be planted and will grow over a much wider area than shown.  
USDA plant hardiness zones 3 to 9.
 

Lupinus perennis,
Perennial Lupine

Alabama
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Louisiana

Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina

Ohio
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin

Use the chart below for shipping charges on Lupinus perennis, Perennial Lupine flower seeds, to order copy the order form or email questions, comments & orders to john@easywildflowers.com

Please contact us by email with your address for shipping charges & availability on Lupinus perennis, Perennial Lupine potted plants

We accept payment by check, money order, and through Paypal

The minimum seed order amount is $10, this can be a combination of different seeds.

subtotal for flower seeds 

shipping charge for seeds

seed orders up to  $20.00    =    $3.00 shipping
$20.01 - $50.00    =    $4.00 shipping
$50.01-$100.00    =    $5.00 shipping

over $100.00    =    5 % of subtotal

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Easyliving Wildflowers
PO Box  522
Willow Springs,  Mo.  65793
phone-fax 417-469-2611 

Lupinus perennis, Perennial Lupine Plant distribution map complements of USDA, NRCS. 2001. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.1
  (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

The Native Menomini fed Lupinus perennis, Perennial Lupine Plants to horses to make them spirited and full of fire. They also rubbed the plant on their own hands or other parts of the body in order to control horses. The Cherokee made a cold infusion from the plant and used it as a wash to check hemorrhage and vomiting. 

Lupinus perennis, Perennial Lupine Sundial Lupine is the only food for the larvae of the Karner Blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis). Both fire suppression and habitat loss have contributed to the decline of the lupine and the butterfly. The Karner Blue is nearly extinct over much of its range. 

Lupinus perennis, Perennial Lupine Plant Description General: Bean Family (Fabaceae). This herbaceous perennial has erect stems that are 2-6 dm, that are thinly pubescent. The petioles are 2-6 cm. The leaves are palmately compound. The leaflets are 7-11, oblanceolate, and are from 2-6 cm. The flowers occur in terminal racemes, arising above the leaves. They are numerous, ranging from blue to pink or white. The fruits are pubescent pods that are oblong, flattened, and with 2-several seeds. They are 3-5 cm. Kenneth Sytsma University of Wisconsin @ Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants 

Lupinus perennis, Perennial Lupine Plants are found in dry, open woods and clearings from southern Maine to Florida, west to Minnesota and Indiana. The plant grows in Pine Barrens and sandy prairies in the east. 

 Lupinus perennis, Perennial Lupine Plant Propagation by seeds: This lupine grows in areas that have been burned. Scarify the seed coat of each seed with sandpaper to make a gentle scratch. The seeds can then be soaked overnight in tepid water. Treat the seeds with a rhizobium inoculant before sowing them. Plant the seeds into cells or flats in a greenhouse and cover them with a quarter inch of soil over the top. Lupines succumb to root rot very easily in pots, so it is best to transplant them to the garden when they have two to three leaves. Seeds can also be cleaned and stored dry at 40 F for several months and then planted directly in the garden in the following spring (after scarification). Seed can be sown with a yard roller or by walking the site. Plant in full sun with good air circulation, in loose, well-drained soil. The plants can tolerate poor, sandy, or gravely soil, preferably acid. If no lupines have been present for many years on the site, wet the seeds and roll them in an inoculant for nitrogen-fixing bacteria before planting. They should germinate in about one week. The roots are strong and deep, making the moving of older established plants difficult.

Showy elongate clusters of purple pea-like flowers top the 1-2 ft. stems of this perennial lupine. Blue pea-like flowers are in an upright elongated terminal cluster on an erect stem with palmately compound leaves. Its leaves are palmately divided into 7-11 leaflets. Occasionally flowers range from pink to white.

The plant was once thought to deplete or wolf the mineral content of the soil; hence the genus name derived from the Latin lupus (wolf). Actually the plant and all the family enhances soil fertility by fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a useful form. In the south this flower has narrower leaflets and is often recognized as a separate species Nuttals Lupine (L. nuttallii). Two southern species with undivided elliptic leaves are Spreading Lupine (L. diffusa) with blue flowers and a whitish spot on the standard (upper petal) and Hairy Lupine (L. villosus) a hairy plant with lavender-blue flowers and a red-purple spot on the standard. They are found from North Carolina to Florida and west to Louisiana. A species found in Nebraska Wyoming and Colorado Nebraska Lupine (L. plattensis) has blue flowers with a dark spot on the standard and paddle-shaped leaflets. L. polyphyllus is becoming extremely abundant in the Northeast particularly Maine and adjacent Canada; it was introduced from the Northwest.